How Going Back to School at 50+ Helped Me Get My Professional Groove Back

16 Apr

My going back to professional life after five years out of the workforce required perseverance and a plan.  Going back to school part-time for upgrading was what made my efforts succeed.  I engaged my brain in vigorous exercise (which aging experts highly recommend for staving off dementia) and I landed a job in a field of communications that was just getting started when I thought my career was ending. I’ve since completed one program at the University of Toronto and am two-thirds the way through a certificate in digital strategy and communications management.  When a representative of U. of T.’s School of Continuing Education heard how I went from dubious doubter to converted  zealot, she asked me to tell my story to a reporter. And I happily obliged. The piece appeared in yesterday’s print and online editions of The Toronto Star.

Read the article here.

While I still enjoy seeing my name in print — and spelled correctly — I wish the writer included what I told him about the other program I completed. I say this because  the Back to Work Program offered by the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto is a one of a kind initiative that has the potential to reinvigorate the confidence of many a sandwiched woman.

Part of Rotman’s Women in Leadership Initiative, the Back to Work Program was designed for those of us who put our careers on hold, and who now want to return after an extended period of absence.  More than a few of the 30 women in the program were or had been juggling childcare and elder care issues. I only have good things to say about my experience at Rotman.

Life is a journey for which we need to take care of ourselves. What things are you doing to improve your situation and keep your brain healthy?

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2 Responses to “How Going Back to School at 50+ Helped Me Get My Professional Groove Back”

  1. Donna Jones October 29, 2013 at 7:35 pm #

    CCAC: Is there a caregivers guide on how to work & navigate through the system. Is there a network of CCAC users who have experience getting a loved one into nursing home – things to avoid, things to look for? It certainly is unchartered water for a lot of us.

    • judila416 October 29, 2013 at 11:09 pm #

      Hi Donna: Thanks for reaching out. One of the reasons I started this blog was so I could help others navigate the system. I so badly wished I had someone to help me navigate through what was uncharted territory for my family at the time we began our journey. While there may be guides out there, every situation and every long term care home is different. Same goes for CCACs and the people who work for them. A lot will depend on where in Ontario your loved one resides. Reports on inspections of Long Term Care homes can be found here.

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