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Are You Guilty of Ageism?

15 Aug

Ageism is the cause of age-based discrimination. It is probably the most tolerated form of social prejudice world wide and it exists in many forms.

I am willing to bet just about everyone has practiced ageism at some point in their lives whether they realize it or not.

Think about it:

  • Have you have ever made a joke about old people or laughed about how an older person was depicted on a television show or movie?
  • Have you ever assumed something about an individual solely because of their age?
  • Have you treated someone differently than you would others due to stereotypes about their age?
According to the Revera Report on Ageism, the three most common forms of age discrimination faced by Canadian seniors are:
  1. being ignored or treated as though they are invisible (41 per cent);
  2. being treated like they have nothing to contribute (38 per cent);
  3. and the assumption seniors are incompetent (27 per cent).

Let’s face it. We’ve all been guilty of ageism at one point or another in our lives. But just because it’s so prevalent doesn’t make it right.  You probably experienced ageism when you were a teenager. If  we  live long enough to see our senior years, we’re likely to experience it again. Are you willing to stem the tide of ageism? If so, how?

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Women Are More Likely Than Men to Reach Age 100

18 Jul

Single or widowed men who live to be over 100 will have lots of ladies to choose from if Canada’s 2011 Census is any indication.

Our most recent national census counted 4,870 women and just 955 men aged 100 and over. The numbers aren’t really a surprise when you take into account the corresponding sex ratio of approximately 500 women for every 100 men, the highest of all age groups.

Among the Canadian population, there were slightly more men than women up to age 26, after which there were more women than men. By age 65, there were about 125 women for 100 men and by age 80, 170 women per 100 men.

More women than men reach the age of 100 because women experience lower probabilities of dying at all ages than men. In 2008, life expectancy at birth was 78.5 years for men and 83.1 years for women.

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Your Chances of Living to 100 are Significantly Better than Winning the Lottery

17 Jul

More people than ever before are living to age 100 or beyond. Whether living that long is a good thing or a bad thing depends on one’s perspective and an individual’s quality of life.

When the 2011 Census was taken there were over 5,800 people in Canada aged 100 years and older.  Most of these centenarians lived in either Ontario (2,030), Quebec (1,345), or British Columbia (875).  These statistics compare to 4,600 centenarians in 2006 and 3,000 in 2001.

It is also worth noting that recent Statistics Canada’s population projections show the number of centenarians will likely continue to rise.  In fact, by 2031, there could be more than 17,000 people age 100 or over in this country.  And by 2061, close to 80,000. By that time, most cohorts of baby boomers will have reached 100.

In the United States, the rate of centenarians was slightly lower than in Canada. Life expectancy in the United States, at 75.6 years for men and 80.8 years for women in 2007, was also slightly lower than in Canada.

The highest number of centenarians in the world can be found in Japan.It has nearly 37 centenarians per 100,000 population, more than twice Canada’s rate. Life expectancy in Japan is also the highest, at 79.6 years for men and 86.4 years for women in 2009.  As for other G20 nations, France, Italy and the United Kingdom also had higher centenarian rates than Canada. The population of these three countries is, on average, older than Canada’s. In France, for example, women had a life expectancy of 84.5 in 2008, compared to 83.1 in Canada.

So how about it? Do you want to live to be 100? And if you do, what do you plan to do now to wage against the overwhelming likelihood of acquiring a dementia-related illness?

Super Senior Sunday — 90 Year Olds Run The 100

2 Jun

“The Sandwich Generation” – A Preview

3 Mar

This video brings up a number of emotions for me. Watch it and let me know your thoughts.

 

Every family is different and we all have our own ways of tackling life’s challenges. I could not imagine bringing either of my old people home to live with my child and I. But that’s me. Would you uproot your children and move half-way across the country for your family?  How would you feel about having your home of 40 years emptied out before your eyes? Is this family better or worse off for having Harry move in with them?

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